merlwyb:

lemme see if it was any good
no delete it i look dumb
17th Feb 201419:05327,346 notes

gotemcoach:

Lakers played tonight.

(via veringa)

gotemcoach:

Melo scores 62 on the Bobcats, breaks Kobe’s MSG scoring record, and JR Smith makes sure to get that camera time.

niggasandcomputers:

baremidriffs7:

tru

Ain’t this same boy try go Super sayin
20th Jan 201423:2123,098 notes
doublecupfullaambrosia:

immigrantgrrl:

beast17sa:

he just had to get the hug

but for why?

this really humanized Aubrey for me
20th Jan 201414:5015,876 notes
shezthebaddest:

tarynel:

fyeahblackhippy:

majestic-blvck:

dreams-season:

Wisdom

The caption made this!

That caption.

Welp

The truth indeed
20th Jan 201414:4930,136 notes

mspaintadventuring:

tranimation:

Patients of surgeon Harold Gillies during WWI and WWII

Okay, these photographs pissed me off a bit, because they don’t show off how much of a genius Dr. Harold Gillies, the father of modern plastic surgery, was.  Rhinoplasty, skin grafts, and facial reconstructions have been practised for centuries.  However, it was this New Zealander surgeon who standardized these techniques and established the discipline of “plastic surgery.”

The introduction of more destructive weapons of WWI and WWII resulted in devastating injuries. In addition, in trench warfare, the head was more exposed than the rest of the body, and soldiers’ faces were often shattered or burnt beyond recognition. Despite the best efforts of surgeons, many soldiers were left hideously disfigured. Traditionally, the edges of facial wounds were simply stitched together, but when scar tissue contracted faces were left twisted and disfigured, so a new type of surgery was needed.

Gillies rebuilt faces using tissue from elsewhere in the body. Antibiotics had not yet been invented, meaning it was very hard to graft tissue from one part of the body to another because infection often developed, so Gillies invented the tubed pedicle,” where he used a flap of skin from the chest or forehead and “swung” it into place over the face. The flap remained attached but was stitched into a tube. This kept the original blood supply intact and dramatically reduced the infection rate.  After many surgical construction, grafting, and healing, which could take months to years, the tentacle-like tubing would be removed, and (volia!) a new face!

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He was also the first to do sex reassignment surgery from female to male in 1946, then male to female using a flap technique in 1951, which became the standard for 40 years.

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tl;dr, these were his patients BEFORE the surgery. He didn’t DISFIGURE these people he HELPED them.

(via bitchesflocktome)

mcmahok1:

awidesetvagina:

this is still the best story ever told at a talk show

My favorite post ever rrrrr

(via bitchesflocktome)

avaavary:

theloveapp:

World Premiere | Jesse Boykins III | Doing It Wrong [Drake Cover] VIDEO | Directed by Jesse Boykins III & Olivia Seally | Babetownbk Productions  

Download P.O.P [purpose or people] EP » bit.ly/POPSchwaza 

🙌🙌

(via theloveapp)

fuckyeahlakers:

That third image is how I look while watching 80% of Laker games this season.

thekidshouldseethis:

This commercial features a 2,100 gallon pool of the cornstarch and water mixture known as oobleck, one of our favorite non-newtonian fluids. It was filmed in Kuala Lumpur by KIX for a Malaysian bank.

There are more creative commercials in the archives, including Music from a Tree by Diego Stocco and Burt’s Bees, Yuki Ariga’s Tissue Paper Animals for Nepia, and one of our favorites: NTT Docomo’s forest xylophone.

Thanks, @cosentino.

(via bitchesflocktome)

Opaque  by  andbamnan